The Psychology of Color in Your Branding

The Psychology of Color in Your Branding

Close your eyes and picture the color red.  What comes to mind?  For some people they might picture a dozen roses or their favorite sports mascot.  These images might lead to a memory of a romantic dinner or a particularly tough victory.  So, why would imagining the color red conjure up these feelings?  Research shows that elements such as personal preference, experience, upbringing, cultural differences, context, and many other factors often impact the affect individual colors have on us.

When it comes to branding and marketing, it’s all about feeling.  When developing a brand identity or marketing campaign, there are many elements that are considered and are usually grouped into “thinking elements” and “feeling elements”.  These feeling elements are the ones that speak to the consumer, that create a bond to your business and evoke positive emotions regarding you and your business.  People want to sense integrity, feel trust, believe your reputation and build a relationship in order to do business with you.

So, without being able to personally engage with each customer, one way to communicate your brand’s identity is through color!  While the psychology of color is still not an exact science, there are those that believe that a single color can represent different emotions to consumers.  For example, yellow is optimistic.  It is a bright color that often is easiest to see.  Hence, the reason why school buses are the brightly hued color – they are easy to see therefore making them safer!  Orange is also bright and attention grabbing and sends a message of creativity and exuberance.  Red may actually raise someone’s pulse and expresses love, warmth, excitement and urgency.  Coke may be one of the most iconic brands – using red as it’s base.  Purple is the color of royalty and opulence.  Blue expresses dependability while green is serene.  However, research has found that color appropriateness is more important than the individual color itself.  So, if your business specializes in tough, outdoor gear, purple might not be the right match.  All of the colors are multi-faceted and can evoke many feelings and emotions, so you must ask yourself: “what am I trying to say?”

Of course we know that certain colors can evoke specific emotions and some may send a specific message.  However, it is more important to choose colors based on your message and what your want your brand to portray rather than what the color is supposed to mean.  While there isn’t a one-to-one formula between a certain color and customer’s buying predictability, there is plenty to consider when choosing a color for your brand.  What do you want your brand to say about your business?  At Performance Group, we can help you with your color questions because we know color is important.